News

Optimizing Canada’s Learning Recognition System

Posted in General News

Join the Conference Board of Canada on February 19, 2016 at 02:00 PM EST for this 60 minute webinar as they evaluate the state of Canadian learning recognition since the publication of the first Brain Gain study in 2001.

Based on the recently released study: Brain Gain 2015: The State of Canada’s Learning Recognition System, this session will explore how the country has adapted to our increasingly mobile workforce, and the consequences of not getting it right.

Canada has long been a country of mobile people. Among Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, Canada’s total immigration numbers trail only the United States and France; and relative to the size of its population, only Australia and Luxembourg. In 2011, immigrants represented 20.6 per cent of Canada’s population, the highest proportion among the G8 countries. In a typical year, Canada welcomes over 250,000 immigrants as permanent residents. Over a five-year period, almost 1 million Canadians move between provinces, often to pursue employment or education opportunities.

However, even with one of the most mobile workforces in the world in terms of international and interprovincial migration, Canada’s learning recognition system continues to be organized along provincial lines. In 2001, The Conference Board of Canada published Brain Gain: The Economic Benefits of Recognizing Learning and Learning Credentials in Canada. The study was the first to collect original data (via a household survey) from Canadians who had experienced challenges with learning recognition. At the time, we calculated that Canada would stand to gain between $4.1 and $5.9 billion through improved learning recognition.